6 Factors Affecting Vaginal Health & How to Keep it Healthy

vaginal health

6 Factors Affecting Vaginal Health & How to Keep it Healthy

Vaginal health is crucial to a woman’s entire well-being. Vaginal issues can impair your fertility, sex desire, and orgasm capacity. Ongoing vaginal health problems can lead to stress, relationship troubles, and a loss of self-confidence.

So, learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of vaginal issues, as well as what you can do to safeguard your vaginal health.

Factors that affect vaginal health:

  1. Unprotected sex with your partner:

Sexual activity that is not protected can lead to a sexually transmitted infection. Vaginal trauma can be caused by forceful intercourse or a pelvic injury.

  1. On-going treatments:

Endometriosis and pelvic inflammatory disease are two conditions that can cause painful sex. Painful sex can also be caused by scarring from pelvic surgery and some cancer therapies. The use of some antibiotics raises the risk of vaginal yeast infection.

  1. Birth control or using feminine hygiene products:

Condoms, diaphragms, and related spermicides are examples of barrier contraception that can induce vaginal irritation. Sprays, deodorants, and douches can irritate the skin or aggravate existing inflammation.

  1. Expecting or have given birth:

If you become pregnant, you will not be able to menstruate until your kid is born. Vaginal discharge frequently rises during pregnancy. During delivery, vaginal rips are rather frequent. An episiotomy – a surgical incision made in the tissue of the vaginal entrance during delivery — may be required in some situations. A vaginal birth might also reduce vaginal muscle tone.

  1. Facing any psychological disorder:

Low arousal and the associated discomfort or pain during sex can be caused by anxiety and sadness. Trauma, such as sexual abuse or a terrible first sexual encounter, can also cause sex-related discomfort.

  1. Hormonal disorder:

Hormone fluctuations might have an impact on your vaginal health. Estrogen production, for example, decreases after menopause and during breastfeeding. Because of the loss of estrogen, the vaginal lining thins (vaginal atrophy), making intercourse unpleasant.

What causes vaginal problems?

  1. It may include any sexual problem:

Consistent or recurring discomfort before, during, or after intercourse is one example (dyspareunia). Involuntary spasms of the vaginal wall muscles might induce pain during penetration (vaginismus). The pelvic floor muscles can become tight, resulting in persistent discomfort and pain during intercourse. Vaginal dryness, which is common after menopause, can make intercourse painful.

  1. Sexually transmitted disease or infections:

Chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital warts, syphilis, and genital herpes are just a few of the sexually transmitted illnesses that can damage the vagina. Abnormal vaginal discharge or genital sores are two signs to look for.

  1. Vaginitis can be a reason:

Inflammation of the vaginal canal can be caused by an infection or a disruption in the usual balance of vaginal yeast and bacteria (vaginitis). Vaginal discharge, odor, itching, and discomfort are all symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis, yeast infections, and trichomoniasis are all common forms of vaginitis.

  1. Other reasons:

Vaginal cysts can make it difficult to insert a tampon or cause pain during intercourse. Vaginal cancer, which can manifest itself as vaginal bleeding after menopause or intercourse, is also an uncommon occurrence.


Also Read: Oral Health: Types, Importance, 4 Ways of Child Dental Care

Vaginal Health Tests:

  1. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) test?

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a vaginal infection. A balanced population of “good” (healthy) and “bad” (unhealthy) bacteria may be found in a healthy vagina.

Normally, the beneficial bacteria keep the harmful bacteria in check. When the natural balance of bacteria is disrupted, harmful bacteria develop instead of good bacteria, a BV infection occurs.

The majority of BV infections are minor and go away on their own. Some women contract BV and recover without even realizing it. BV infections, on the other hand, can be more severe and may not go away without treatment.

If left untreated, BV might raise your chances of contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD) like chlamydia, gonorrhea, or HIV.

If you are pregnant and have a BV infection, your chances of having a preterm (early) delivery or a baby with a low birth weight are increased (less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces at birth). Low birth weight can lead to significant health issues in a newborn, such as infections, respiratory difficulties, and feeding and weight gain issues.

  • When do you need to go for the BV test?

If you experience BV symptoms, you may need to get tested. These are some of them:

  • Vaginal discharge that is grey or white.
  • A pungent, fishy stench, which may be amplified after intercourse.
  • In the vaginal area, there is pain and/or itching.
  • Urinating causes a burning feeling.
  • What is the procedure of the BV test?

A BV test is performed in the same manner as a pelvic exam or Pap smear is performed. During the examination,

You will remove all of your clothing below the waist. As a cover, you will be given a gown or a sheet.

Your feet will be in stirrups when you lie on your back on an exam table.

A speculum will be inserted into your vaginal canal by your health care practitioner. The speculum gently stretches the sides of your vaginal opening apart.

Your physician will take a sample of your vaginal discharge with a cotton swab or a wooden stick.

  • Things to remember 24 hours before the test:

  1. No use of tampons.
  2. Don’t have sex.
  • What to do after the results:

If you have a BV infection, your doctor will likely prescribe antibiotic tablets as well as antibiotic creams or gels that you may apply directly to your vaginal area.

After effective therapy, a BV infection might resurface. If this occurs, your doctor may prescribe a different drug or a different dose of the one you were taking previously.

If you are pregnant and have been diagnosed with BV, it is critical to treat the infection since it might harm your unborn child. Your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic medication that is safe to take while you’re pregnant.

If your findings come back negative for BV bacteria, your doctor may order further testing to determine the source of your symptoms.

  • How you can lower the risk of infection?

  • Do not employ douchebags.
  • Limit the number of sex partners you have.
  • Safely make sexual contact.

Vaginal Health Foods:

Here are the top foods for a healthy vagina:

  1. Plain Yogurt:

The vaginal pH, like the pH readings you came up with, in the lab is acidic, ranging from 3.5 to 4.5 on a scale of zero to 14.

  1. Cranberry juice:

Fresh cranberries or 100% cranberry juice (not the sweetened stuff) are high in antioxidants and acidic chemicals, which are effective infection fighters and can prevent germs from sticking to the bladder.

Cranberries have been shown in studies to be particularly effective in avoiding UTIs among women who have had recurring or recent UTI difficulties.

Just steer clear from the sugary cranberry juice kinds, which might actually make matters worse in your stomach.

Conclusion:

Vaginal Health is one of the crucial parts of overall health. If it is ignored, it may lead to severe consequences. Hence every woman should take proper care of her vaginal health. Here are some of the factors that affect it.

  • Unprotected Sex
  • Birth Control
  • On-going Treatments
  • Childbirth
  • Hormonal Disorder
  • Psychological Disorder

Related Questions :

  • How do I balance my pH naturally?

Probiotics and Yogurt are two natural ways to restore pH balance. Probiotics are gaining popularity as a supplement for a reason: they may aid in the restoration of natural bacterial equilibrium. This also aids in normalizing vaginal pH. Keep in mind that some yogurts contain helpful bacteria as well.

  • How can I check my pH at home?

How are you going to conduct this test? You place a piece of pH paper on the vaginal wall for a few seconds, then compare the color of the pH paper to the color on the test kit’s chart. The vaginal pH number is the color on the chart that best matches the color on the pH paper.

  • What’s the best way to keep your vagina healthy?

Safer sex is one of the finest and easiest things you can do for your vaginal health. Here are some safety suggestions: Protect yourself. This might be anything from a condom to a dental dam to gloves. It isn’t rocket science, and you already know you should do it, so go ahead and do it. Get tested for sexually transmitted infections on a regular basis (STIs).

  • What are the symptoms of an infection in the vagina?

Vaginitis. Inflammation of the vaginal canal can be caused by an infection or a disturbance in the natural balance of vaginal yeast and bacteria (vaginitis). Vaginal discharge, odor, itching, and soreness are all symptoms. Bacterial vaginosis, yeast infections, and trichomoniasis are all common kinds of vaginitis.

  • How does your vagina affect your overall health?

Staff from the Mayo Clinic. Vaginal health is crucial to a woman’s entire well-being. Vaginal disorders can influence your fertility, sex desire, and orgasm ability. Ongoing vaginal health problems can lead to stress, relationship challenges, and a loss of self-confidence.


You May Also Read: Happy Hormones: A Complete Guide to Happiness

Share this post

Comments (2)

  • Buy Shared Proxies Reply

    I love what you guys are usually up too. Such clever work and coverage! Keep up the very good works guys I’ve you guys to our blogroll.

    July 30, 2021 at 1:49 pm
  • Safe Proxies Reply

    I’ve been exploring for a bit for any high quality articles or blog posts on this sort of area . Exploring in Yahoo I at last stumbled upon this website. Reading this info So i’m happy to convey that I’ve a very good uncanny feeling I discovered exactly what I needed. I most certainly will make sure to don’t forget this website and give it a glance regularly.

    August 2, 2021 at 1:31 pm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *